Colour-Symbol-Image: Focusing on visual connections

The Colour-Symbol-Image routine helps students to express their thinking non-verbally. Especially in the case of younger learners, this taps right into their natural creativity and desire for expression. It is a routine that encourages them to identify and capture the heart of ideas they have explored through reading, watching or listening to the selected source material. As they make their selections of colours, symbols, images, students are pushed to make connections and think metaphorically.

Metaphors are a powerful way to develop our understanding of ideas by associating a new concept with a more familiar one and making comparisons. The connections and ideas students come up with need to be understood as highly personal. Therefore we should not evaluate them as they occur. All ideas are possibilities and students should generate as many as they can before identifying degrees of merit.

This routine is best used after students have read a passage from a book, a short story, or a poem, listened to a radio essay or watched a short film, reached the end of a topic or unit. Language level-appropriate, students explain and justify their choices in writing.

Step 1

After having gone through the source material, ask students to take the following steps:

Choose a colour that they feel represents the ideas discussed. Explain why they chose it. (One or two colours should be chosen by students.)

Choose a symbol. Explain why they chose it. (A symbol is something that stands for or suggests something else. For example, roses stand for romance, a heart stands for love, a dove stands for peace.)

Choose an image. Explain why they chose it. (Students may use a photograph or sketch their own drawings. They should not worry about their drawing abilities as it can be something very simple that captures their idea.)

Step 2

Have students work individually, in pairs or in groups. Working with a partner or in a group has the advantage over individual work in that students learn to offer arguments and negotiate meaning.

Step 3

Share the thinking and ideas. Use the student-made output as a teaching input. Have individual students, pairs or groups present their choices and hold a plenary discussion.

Classroom practice

We tried this routine at the end of the topic of war/peace. Students organized themselves in small groups and chose what they wished to represent – war or peace. In my mixed ability primary school classroom this organization worked well. Students shared their ideas with the other members of the group before deciding on the final outcome. Members of the group could contribute in diverse ways. Some were stronger at the verbal part while others at the non-verbal, drawing part. Students first kept notes of their ideas, then shared them among their groups and we used sheets of A3 paper size for the final outcome.

Examples of students’ ideas include:

Things to note: Some groups may find it easier to start with the other parts of the routine first, i.e. symbol or image. The order is not binding.

References

Papalazarou, C (2015) ‘Making thinking visible in the English classroom: nurturing a creative mind-set’ in Maley, A and Peachey, N (eds) Creativity in the English language classroom. British Council: 37-43. Available free as a pdf file.

Ritchhart, R, Church, M and Morrison, K (2011) Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Visible Thinking, Colour, Symbol, Image Routine

War/Peace: Colour-symbol-image, Art in the English Class project

Posted in Thinking Routines explained, War/Peace | 2 Comments

Step Inside:perceive-believe-care about

Step Inside: perceive-believe-care about is a routine that can work effectively towards appreciation of the other’s perspective. It asks students to step inside a character and deepen their understanding. Perspective often shapes the way things are understood, so this focus on perspective appreciation can lead to a deeper awareness and help stimulate empathy.

Step 1

Show students a work of art, a photograph, a video. The source material may also be a story or a poem the class has read. When working on issues of social justice and fairness, choice of material that can evoke an emotional response and lead to more creative understanding is of importance. It might also be material that involves some sort of dilemma calling for multiple perspectives to be considered.

Step 2

Ask students to step inside, place themselves within the situation and imagine they are a character from the source material. From this perspective, ask them to reflect on the questions:

What do you perceive?

What might you believe?

What might you care about?

Perceive here can be replaced by see, observe or understand. Likewise, believe can be replaced by know or think.

It is interesting to note the use of might in the second and third question. Might sends the message to students that the idea is not to come up with a single answer, but to think broadly about alternatives. Using conditional language signifies our attempt to understand someone else’s perspective through hypothesis making and raising possibilities.

Step 3

Students can work individually, in pairs or in groups. They can first take notes of their responses before sharing them with the rest of the class.

Step 4

Share the thinking and ideas. If students have worked individually you may consider placing them in groups where each member has chosen a different perspective. Another idea would be that students who have chosen the same perspective are grouped together and compare their responses.

Classroom practice

We were working on the topic of deforestation. We tried the routine after having watched a short video of Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree and gone through a relevant ppt presentation of the story.  I asked students to Step Inside the story and imagine they were the tree or the boy. From their chosen perspective they had to respond to the questions. The ideas shared:

Another occasion was when we were working on the topic of bullying. In this case we used the routine to introduce the topic. The source material we used was a detail from Pieter Brueghel’s painting Children’s Games.  The detail showed six boys holding another boy by feet and hands. It was the bump bouncing game which involved bouncing someone’s buttocks on a wooden plunk as a form of punishment. I asked students to Step Inside and imagine they were the boy in the middle of the picture. Their ideas:

In this case I had asked students to Step Inside the character of the boy in the middle of the painting. It would be more complete and interesting in terms of understanding perspectives around bullying to have them also consider the viewpoint of the group of children who were bump bouncing him. I tried to bridge this gap with some follow up questions like: Why do you think the boys behave like that? or why do you think they punish him?

You can also read about this routine in Chapter 4 of the British Council’s new book ‘Creativity in the English language classroom’ (Edited by Alan Maley and Nik Peachey). It is a collaborative publication comprising of 18 chapters, each with a blend of theory and practical activities. The pdf can be found free to download here. Among the contributors there are many members of the C Group, an initiative that brings together a collection of people and a cluster of ideas sharing the belief for reinforced creativity in ELT through collective action.

References

Children’s Games: Perceive-Believe-Care About, Art in the English Class project

Ritchhart, R, Church, M and Morrison, K (2011) Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. pp. 178-184.

The Giving Tree: Step Inside/Perceive-Believe-Care About, Art in the English Class project

Visible Thinking, Step Inside: Perceive-Believe-Care About

 

Posted in Environment/Nature, Thinking Routines explained | 6 Comments

See-Think-Wonder: The impact of curiosity on learning

See-Think-Wonder is the first routine I’ve ever used and the first one I wrote about in a post for the Teaching English British Council blog community. It is a routine that asks students to observe carefully, think about what they see, and ask questions. The wonderful thing about it is that it taps right into students’ imagination and curiosity. Curiosity when aroused means they are highly motivated, alert and open to learning. This openness in turn, allows for interesting and original observations, thoughts and questions which are communicated through meaningful language.

Step 1

At the beginning of a topic or a unit, show students a painting, an image, an object. Make sure you choose a powerful stimulus to encourage observation, interpretation and wondering.

Step 2

Ask students to reflect on the questions:

What do you see?

What do you think about it?

What does it make you wonder?

Step 3

Allow for some quiet, uninterrupted observation time. Students can first jot down their responses before sharing them with the rest of the class. They work individually, in pairs or in small groups. It depends on how many ideas you want them to generate.

Step 4

Have students present and share their responses with the rest of the class. Document their thinking and ideas. You can do this by using the board, post-it notes, construction papers on the walls, by encouraging the students to jot down the ideas shared.

Classroom practice

See-Think-Wonder is a routine that works well when starting a topic. As with other thinking routines it’s important for a routine to be attached to meaningful content for thinking beyond surface to occur. I have used it with various topics: War/Peace, Asperger’s & Autism, School, The myth of Europe, Urbanization. I mainly used it when introducing the topic. I am sharing here two examples.

1. When introducing the topic of War/Peace I showed children Picasso’s Guernica. We first explored the painting through the Looking Ten Times Two routine. Groups then worked on the See-Think-Wonder. The ideas shared were:

2. A second case was when introducing the topic of Asperger’s & Autism. This time I chose Blue Butterflies Tongue, a fascinating painting by Steven Coventry, an artist with Asperger’s syndrome. This time many children chose to work in pairs so more ideas were shared:

In both these cases, the See-Think-Wonder routine unleashed in a beautiful way  students’ creative and metaphoric thinking. The surprise and curiosity evoked by the visual stimuli used led to a heightened state of consciousness and emotion brought about by something unexpected. They contemplated with joy, their interest was stimulated, the stage for further inquiry was set, and positive expectations for the next lessons to come were created.

Things to consider: Students must provide answers to all three stems at the same time (I see-I think-I wonder). When you first use the routine, they may respond only to the first stem (I see). In this case prompt responses to the other two by asking the follow-up questions (i.e. What do you think about it? What does it make you wonder?). Once they get used to the routine, they’ll provide answers to all three stems at the same time.

References

Blue Butterflies Tongue: See-Think-Wonder, Art in the English Class project

Future Megacities: See-Think-Wonder, Art in the English Class project

Guernica: See-Think-Wonder, Art in the English Class project

School: See-Think-Wonder, Art in the English Class project

Visible Thinking, See-Think-Wonder

 

Posted in Thinking Routines explained, War/Peace | 7 Comments

Sentence-Phrase-Word: Capturing the essence of a text

In this post I will describe the Sentence-Phrase-Word thinking routine. It is a routine that helps learners engage meaningfully with a text with a focus on capturing “what speaks to them”. It also calls for them to justify their choices which makes it a useful springboard into a speaking activity.

Step 1
After reading a text ask students to identify:

  • a sentence that was important, meaningful to them
  • a phrase that moved them
  • a word that struck them as powerful

Students can work individually, in pairs or in groups. It depends on how many ideas you want to generate. They can first take notes of their selections and the reason behind them before sharing them with the rest of the class. There are actually no right or wrong answers since their choices of sentences, phrases, and words will reflect their own experience.

Step 2
Students can present and share their selections of sentences/phrases/words. Sharing can be done a) in pairs or small groups and/or b) in the form of a plenary discussion. Use the board to record their choices so that everyone can see and comment on them. Encouraging the rest of the class to take notes of their classmates’ selections is also an add-on.

Step 3
After sharing invite students to reflect on the discussion. They can a) identify common themes that have emerged from their responses and b) the implications that lie behind.

Step 4
If possible, post all answers in the classroom and provide some time for students to think again on their classmates’ sentences/phrases/words. This will contribute to a better personal and collective understanding of the text.

Classroom experience
I have tried this routine on two occasions so far. The first was with the topic of friendship where I used a short extract from Hans Christian Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling.  After reading aloud the extract to the children, they silent read it in small groups while I provided groups with some help on vocabulary where necessary. Groups then worked on the routine. The ideas shared in class were:

The second time was with Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree while working on the topic of deforestation. We first watched a video rendering and went through a ppt slide presentation of the book. Then, students worked in pairs, with a story hand-out and chose their sentences/phrases/words. Their responses:

Things to consider: An issue I had to deal with was how to explain to my 12 year old students, 2 multi-level (pre-intermediate/intermediate) groups the difference between sentence and phrase. I gave them an example showing the difference between sentence and phrase like so:

Sentence (begins with a capital, ends in a full stop, period, question mark or exclamation mark, expresses a complete thought): This is a sentence as you can see.

Phrase (part of a sentence, does not express a complete thought): as you can see

The routine can also work nicely with just two of the three stems (sentence/word).

References
The Ugly Duckling, Art in the English Class project

The Giving Tree, Art in the English Class project

Ritchhart, R, Church, M and Morrison, K (2011) Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. pp. 207-213.

Posted in Thinking Routines explained | 19 Comments

Beginning-Middle-End: Creative writing and storytelling

Beginning-Middle-End is a thinking routine that stems from the Artful Thinking approach which aims at stronger thinking and learning through the power of art.
I have found it an effective way to a) stimulate students’ imagination and curiosity b) encourage their observation and strategies of making predictions and c) help develop their creative writing and storytelling skills through the power of narrative. I have tried it with intermediate+ students.

Step 1                                                                                                                                        Show students an artful stimulus (painting, image, screenshot from a film, sculpture). Ask them to look at it in silence for a couple of minutes.

Step 2
Hold a plenary discussion by brainstorming ideas about things and key elements students see in the stimulus. If students share their interpretations ask them what they see that supports this idea.

Step 3
Ask students to choose, think and respond to one of these questions:

1. If what you see is the beginning of a story, what might happen next?
2. If it is the middle of a story, what might have happened before? What might happen next?
3. If it is the end of a story, what might the story be?
Students can work in small groups, in pairs or individually.

Step 4
Have students share their thinking and ideas.

Classroom practice

When working with my students on the topic of War/Peace I showed them a screenshot from the short animation film Chromophobia by the Belgian film maker Raul Servais. Then they worked in groups and each group chose one of the questions (step 3) to work on. After that we watched the film.

e39af-chrom1c

Screenshot from Chromophobia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is what students came up with:

Tips
The questions in the routine are written in an open-ended way. You can use them as such with any artful visual stimulus. You can also connect them with a specific topic – as in the classroom example above – and ask students to keep this topic in mind when they imagine their stories.

Students can come up with sentences or paragraphs.

The routine can also work well as a speaking activity. In this case work as a whole class by asking someone to begin a story and having others continue it.

References
Art in the English Class Project, Chromophobia: Beginning-Middle-End
Artful Thinking, http://www.pzartfulthinking.org/index.php
Visible Thinking,
http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html

Posted in Thinking Routines explained, War/Peace | 5 Comments

3-2-1 Bridge: A creative warm-up and follow-up routine

In this post I will talk about the 3-2-1 Bridge thinking routine. The word Bridge is used to indicate the routine has two related stages. I have found it an interesting and effective activity in prompting students’ creative thinking. This applies to a) activating their prior knowledge on a topic, b) fostering their readiness in generating ideas c) extending their thinking to new directions and d) facilitating reflection on this shift in their thinking. The routine works well as warm-up at the beginning and as a follow-up at the end of a topic.

Step 1
At the beginning of the topic ask students to generate
3 words
2 questions
1 simile

that quickly come to mind when they think of this topic. Students can work individually, in pairs or in groups. Explain that similes are connections we make, comparing one thing to another because they are alike in some way. The words “like” or “as” are typically used. Ask students for an example of a simile first and provide one yourself if needed.

Step 2

Share the thinking. Ask students to share their ideas with their classmates and make them visible within the classroom.

This is how my students responded to this part of the routine. I tried it with 2 groups of 6th grade primary school students (mixed ability, pre-intermediate/intermediate). We did this routine when working on the topic of friendship. Students first recorded their responses in their notebooks, shared them with their classmates, and displayed them in the classroom on post-it notes.

Step 3                                                                                                                                              Provide a period of further learning and elaborating on the topic. This may be a text, story, video, image that conveys new information. Make sure that this instructional period is sufficient for students to move their thinking beyond their initial understandings.

Step 4                                                                                                                                                      At the end of the topic, return to the 3-2-1 routine and repeat step 1. That is, ask the students again for 3 words, 2 questions and 1 simile about the topic.

Step 5                                                                                                                                               Share the thinking by Bridging. You can do this by holding a plenary discussion or having students discuss in pairs how their thinking and final responses might be similar or different from their initial ones.

In my classroom practice the instructional period involved: a set of questions for students to reflect upon and respond, an extract from a poem, a extract from a short story and a short animation film. It was really interesting how after reading, watching and discussing, new thoughts and ideas came to the fore. Students’ final response to the 3-2-1 Bridge revealed a more extended use of the notions of judging, rejection, weakness, betrayal, jealousy and selfishness when we think about friendship than in their initial responses. These notions may have to do with many different issues, but some of the ones students thought are important were: appearance, disability, coming from another country, being a very good or a bad student. As one student wrote in her final remarks:

Why don’t you want me?
Because I’m ugly, too short, fat
or from another country?

Do you reject me?

It was also interesting that in their final responses many of the students wrote that empathy is important when we talk and think about friendship.

Tip: the routine works well with topics students have prior knowledge of.

Resources

Art in the English Class Project, http://1stchaidarienglish.blogspot.gr/search/label/Friendship

Visible Thinking, http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html

Posted in Thinking Routines explained | 12 Comments

Headlines: Recycling Vocabulary Creatively

A post for the Teaching English British Council blog community. It’s on recycling vocabulary creatively through the use of the Headlines routine. Link to post

head1

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