All posts by Chrysa

Urbanization

Description: This proposal is organized around the theme of urbanization through the use of 2 works of art by Cyril E. Power and LS Lowry, 20th century English artists of the emerging modern city, three urbanization infographics, and a short video on urbanization and the evolution of cities by Vance Kite on TEDEd. The Visible Thinking routines used are: What Makes You Say That, See-Think-Wonder, and Connect-Extend-Challenge.

Level: Intermediate-Upper Intermediate
Learners: All ages
Theme: Urbanization
Language: Urbanization related vocabulary                                                Skills: Observing and describing, drawing inferences, understanding alternatives and multiple perspectives, speaking, watching a short video, making connections between prior ideas and new knowledge         

Materials: Paintings slides, infographics, a short video

Step 1  

Show students each painting and ask them: What’s going on? What do you see that makes you say that? You can use a tree map to document students’ answers.

Step 2                                                                                                   

Brainstorm students around the common elements in the 2 paintings. Elicit that both of them deal with aspects of urban life. Ask them a) how they think the people in the paintings feel, and b) how they themselves feel by looking at the paintings.

Step 3                                                                                                      

Show your students the infographic below. Have them work in groups and answer the following questions in writing. Then, hold a plenary discussion.

Where were the first cities?
What did the first settlements depend on?
What happened from the 18th to the 20th century?
Where is most of the urbanization taking place?
What are some of the issues related with urbanization?

https://magic.piktochart.com/embed/1437108-urban-copy-2-conflict-copy

Step 4                                                                                                                     

Show your students the following image. Ask them what they think it is about. Get answers from the whole class. Tell them that it is a 15” UNICEF infographic of 100 years of urban growth. Follow the link and show the infographic. Have your students name the countries where most of the urbanization is taking place.

d4649-unicef-urban-growth-map

http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/urbanmap/#

Step 5                                                                                                                    

Write the following numbers on the board. Have your students read them aloud, and copy them in their notebooks:

3%
47%
83
468
> 1,000,000
3.3
5
2030

Step 6                                                                                                               

Show them the infographic below and ask them how the numbers are related to it. Have them first write sentences in pairs. Allow 10 minutes and get feedback.

https://magic.piktochart.com/embed/1430541-figures

Step 7

Show students the photograph below and ask: What do you see?
What do you think about it?
What does it make you wonder?3cb63-fantasy_future_megacity_017466_


Step 8
Write on the board: How can future cities adapt to growing populations? Brainstorm students around this question.

Step 9
Tell students they are going to watch a short video on the past and future evolution of cities. Ask them to focus on the suggestions put forward regarding the ways cities might adapt to growing populations. Show the video (this part starts at 3:00). If needed show for a second time.


Suggestions: adequate food/sanitation/education/sustainable growth/environment protection/food production might move to vertical farms, skyscrapers, roof top gardens/power from multiple sources of renewable energy/vertical residencies instead of single family homes/self-contained buildings/smaller self sufficient cities focused on local and sustainable production

There is also a subtitled version of the video you might consider showing: http://amara.org/el/videos/M4QLlAorzKHp/info/urbanization-and-the-future-of-cities-vance-kite/?tab=video

Step 10                                                                                                         

Organize your students in groups. Ask them to review all the ideas and information explored concerning the theme of urbanization. Then ask them to think about these questions:

How are the ideas and information connected to yourselves?
What new ideas did you get that extended or pushed your thinking in new directions?
What is still challenging for you? What questions, puzzles or wonderings do you now have?

Have groups share their thoughts in writing first. Then hold a plenary discussion. Keep a visible record of students’ ideas.

I hope you find this proposal worth experimenting with.

Disability

Description: This proposal is organized around the theme of disability related to mobility issues through the use of Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s painting The Beggars (The Cripples), a short video by Claire Cunningham, a multi-disciplinary performer and choreographer based in Glasgow, and a short animation from the Scottish Human Rights Commission and the Equality and Human Rights Commission Scotland. The thinking routines used are Compass Points, and Headlines.


Level: Intermediate-Upper Intermediate
Learners: All ages
Theme: Disability
Language: Disability related vocabulary, can/can’t                                     Skills: Acquire vocabulary for talking about disabilities and ableism, watching 2 short videos, exploring various facets and sides of disability, talking about stereotypes, summing things up and coming to some tentative conclusions                                                                                                

Materials: 2 short videos, painting slide, statements slides, worksheet

Warm up
Brainstorm your students around what they can or can’t do. Conclude that for each one of us there are things we can and things we can’t do.

Step 1

Show your students the picture below and ask them what they think the woman in the picture can or can’t do. Keep a visible record of students’ answers.

 

Step 2

Tell your students that her name is Claire Cunningham, and she’s a multi-disciplinary performer and choreographer whose work is initially rooted in the use of crutches. Through them she explores the potentiality of her specific physicality as a disabled individual, and aims to challenge conventions around classical aesthetic and dance. Tell them that they are going to watch a relevant video. Show the video.

Step 3

Work as a whole class. Draw a compass in the centre of the board or on a construction paper and mark E, W, N, S.

 
Provide students with the following prompts to talk about:
E = Excited
What excites you about this idea?
W = Worrisome
What do you find worrisome about this idea?
N = Need to Know
What else do you need to know or find out about this idea?
S = Stance or Suggestion for Moving Forward
What is your current stance or opinion on the idea?
Keep a visible record of students’ responses in the appropriate direction: E, W, N, or S. Students’ responses are recorded for the entire class to see so that they are enabled to build on each other’s ideas.

Step 4
Show your students Pieter Bruegel’s painting and ask them:
What have the picture and the painting got in common?
How are they different?
The Cripples
Pieter Bruegels, The Beggars (The Cripples)
Step 5
Show them the slide and ask them to match key words about disability with their definitions.
Step 6
Organize your students in groups. Hand out the worksheet and ask them to classify the words in two groups: words that reflect dignity and a positive attitude towards disability related to mobility issues vs. words that are hurtful or offensive. Go round the class and help with vocabulary if needed or advise students to look up unknown words in the dictionary. Allow 20 minutes and get feedback.

//www.scribd.com/embeds/205788295/content?start_page=1&view_mode=scroll&access_key=key-1kiy4drjgz9v388xko45&show_recommendations=true

Step 7

Write on the board: Stereotype. Explain to your students that it is grouping individuals together and having thoughts, beliefs or judgements about them without knowing them. It is the product of ignorance or unfamiliarity. Explain that stereotyping is not only hurtful, it is also wrong.

Step 8

Tell your students that they are going to have a look at some slides involving both stereotypical and right ways to think about people with a mobility disability. Show your students the slides below. Pause at each slide and discuss which case it falls into. Ask individual students to read the statements in the slides.

Step 9

Ask your students:
What problems might persons with disability face?
What are their rights?

Tell your students that they are going to watch a short animation video from the Scottish Human Rights Commission and the Equality and Human Rights Commission Scotland on the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Show the video.

Step 10
Hold a plenary discussion on the rights of disabled persons mentioned in the video. The right to…choose support for independent living/work/equal access and participation to education/be free from violence/have their voice heard/access sport, culture and leisure /decide where to live/who to be in a relationship with/who to live with/have access to information.

Step 11
Discuss the idea that disabilities are in society and in a lack of accessibility, rather than in the individuals themselves.

Step 12
Ask students: If you were to write a headline for this topic or issue that captured the most important aspect that should be remembered, what would that headline be? Let students expand on it creatively or by writing a newspaper article on the theme.

I hope you will find this proposal worth experimenting with.

Deforestation

Description: This proposal is organized around the theme of deforestation through the use of 3 paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Constable and Seurat and Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree and a short motion graphic video by Sasha Milic, a Norwegian designer, animator and illustrator. The thinking routines used are: Step Inside: Perceive-Believe-Care About, Sentence-Phrase-Word and Now-Then-Later.


Level: Intermediate+

Learners: All ages

Theme: Deforestation

Language: Deforestation related vocabulary, 2nd conditional             

Skills: Creative understanding, watching 2 short videos, reading, exploring different perspectives and viewpoints, engagement with and capturing text essence, identifying actions to make a situation more fair                                                                                                                

Materials: Paintings slides, 2 short videos, story transcript

Step 1
Show students the paintings below and ask them what they have in common. Elicit that all three of them have trees.

Step 2
Ask your students: How do you think these famous paintings would be if they didn’t have trees? Have students express their opinions using the 2nd conditional: If these paintings didn’t have trees I think they would be…

Step 3
Tell them that Edinburgh University’s Iain Woodhouse, who maps forests using satellites, photo-shopped the trees out of these famous paintings to show the aesthetic value they have and to draw attention to the threat of global deforestation. Show them the photo-shopped paintings.

Step 4
Work as a whole class and brainstorm your students around ways trees can be useful to people.

Step 5
Write on the board: The Giving Tree. Tell your students that they are going to watch a video based on a book by an English author, Shel Silverstein with this title. Ask them what they think the book is about. Show the video.

Step 6
Ask your students: how did the story make you feel?


Step 7
Show students the slide share presentation below and ask individual students to read the text in the slides.

Ask students to step inside the narrative and imagine they are the tree or the boy. From their chosen point of view they should first write down and then speak about what they might perceive-believe-care about. Go around the class and help with vocabulary if needed. Allow 15 minutes and get feedback. As individual students speak from their perspective, the rest of the class could guess which perspective they are speaking from. Keep a visible record of students’ different perspectives and viewpoints. You can read here how my students responded to this routine.


Step 8
Hand out the video transcript and ask them to read the story again. While reading ask them to choose: a) a sentence that was meaningful to them, that they feel captures a big idea of the text b) a phrase that moved or engaged them and c) a word that captured their attention or struck them as powerful. Allow 15 minutes and get feedback. Here is an account of working on this routine in class.

Step 9
Tell students that they are going to watch a short motion graphic video which is an effort to improve environmental awareness about deforestation in Indonesia, one of the countries with the highest rate of deforestation, caused by paper industry. Show the video.

The Forest from Sasha Milic on Vimeo.

Step 10
Ask them to write down the effects of deforestation (reduced biodiversity/wildlife deprived of habitat, release of greenhouse gas emissions, global warming, climate change).

Step 11
Write on the board: Deforestation-let’s make it fair: Now-Then-Later. Ask students to brainstorm ideas for things they might do to “make it fair”. Sort the list into actions that relate to making the situation fair in the past, now, or for the future. As students talk, record their ideas on the board or on chart paper.

(possible ideas: stricter laws for companies, recycle, buy products from recycled materials, reuse, plant trees)

Step 12
Ask students to choose one idea from the list they feel is most important and expand on it verbally, in writing or explore it creatively (drawings/collages/poems).

I hope you find this proposal worth experimenting with.

First Day at School

Description: This proposal is designed around the theme of school through the use of the poem First Day at School by Roger McGough, one of Britain’s best loved poets, and a relevant animated short video. Students practise reading, hypotheses making and reflect on their first day at school. The thinking routine used is Explanation Game.

Level: Intermediate                                                                                               Learners: All ages                                                                                                          Theme: School                                                                                                                 Language: School and feelings toward school related vocabulary, responding to wh- questions                                                                                        Skills: Parts of the speech identification, reading a poem, speaking, writing, development of causal explanation and hypotheses making, watching a short videoMaterials: Tagxedo slide or hand-out, poem hand-out, a short video

Warm up
Show your students the tagxedo of the poem and ask them to guess what the poem is about from the words they can see in the tagxedo.
Step 1
Pair your students and ask them to look at the tagxedo again and organize as many words as they can in categories: nouns, verb forms (gerunds, participles), adjectives. Allow 10 minutes and get feedback. Alternatively, you can hand out the black and white version of the tagxedo.

//www.scribd.com/embeds/199440416/content?start_page=1&view_mode=scroll&access_key=key-1e11xo2gvnboj505y2sa&show_recommendations=true

Step 2
Organize your students in 3 groups, one for each stanza of the poem. Precut and jumble the lines of each stanza. Distribute the jumbled lines of the stanzas to each group. Ask them to order them in the correct sequence. Facilitate students by providing the first line of each stanza. Allow 15 minutes and get feedback.

//www.scribd.com/embeds/199444321/content?start_page=1&view_mode=scroll&show_recommendations=true

Step 3
Give your students the poem to read. Ask groups: a) Do you have any different thoughts now about what the poem is about? b) Can you give a title? Keep a visible record of students’ differentiated thoughts and titles.

Step 4
Say: I notice millionbillionwillion miles (wordplay to show extreme distance from) in the first stanza, lessins (lessons) and glassrooms (classrooms) in the second, yellowellies (wellington boots) in the third. That’s interesting. What do you think they mean? Who is the speaker? (A young child who has just been dropped off by his mother in the playground of a school on his very first day). Then, go on with: I notice railings in the second stanza, wolves and monsters. That’s strange. Where do you think the speaker is? How does he feel? (Confused, alone, slightly scared). Finally, return to lessins and glassrooms and ask your students. Why do you think the poet uses these words? (to show the child’s confusion or misinterpretations of what he has been told about school).
Note:
1. The railings that surround the playground are first seen by the child as a protection from outside threats (wolves and monsters) then as prison bars designed to prevent his escape from other monsters (lessins kept in glassrooms).
2. His wellington boots (yellowwellies), his name (I wish I could remember my name), his mother (I wish she was here) reflect his life certainties and the desire for the comfort of his mother’s presence.

Step 5
Ask your students: Do you have any other questions about the poem? A visible record of students’ explanations and questions from steps 3, 4 and 5 is kept visible to the class as they are shared.

Step 6
Ask your students: How would you read this poem? In a comic/funny/sad/serious way? Let groups decide and read the poem in their chosen way.
Note: the tone of the poem is actually a comic one with the intention of empathizing with the child’s insecurity and confusion.

Step 7
Reveal the title of the poem and the name of the poet. Then, ask them to respond in writing to the following prompts: a) three things they like about the poem b) three things they don’t like or don’t fully understand c) three questions they would ask if the poet were here.

Step 8

Tell your students: You are video producers and your job is to present this poem. What images would you use to accompany it? Allow 10 minutes for the groups to write down their ideas. Then, tell them that they’re going to watch a video animation of the poem. Show the video.

Step 9
Ask them if they liked the video and draw comparisons with their ideas.

Homework
Ask students to write a text reflecting on their first day at school.

I hope you find this proposal worth experimenting with.